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The Center for Bright Beams, A National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center

Diversity & Inclusion

The Center for Bright Beams – A Culture of Inclusion

The Center for Bright Beams is a diverse and inclusive organization that equally supports people of all genders, races, religions, sexual orientations, abilities and has a measurable impact on the participation of underrepresented groups in sciences and technology, particularly in accelerator science.

CBB's Strategic Diversity Objectives and Deliverables


Resources for Increasing Diversity in Science:


The logo for Harvard's Project Implicit

Understanding Implicit Bias:

Implicit bias is an automatic reaction we have towards other people. These attitudes and stereotypes can negatively impact our understanding, actions, and decision-making.

  • Project Implicit: The Implicit Association Test (IAT) measures attitudes and beliefs that people may be unwilling or unable to report. The IAT may be especially interesting if it shows that you have an implicit attitude that you did not know about. For example, you may believe that women and men should be equally associated with science, but your automatic associations could show that you (like many others) associate men with science more than you associate women with science. Awareness of our biases is the first step in combatting them.
  • Diversity in Science – An Everyone Issue with Dr. Corrie Moreau.
National Mentoring Community logo

Effective Mentoring:

Mentoring creates a culture of inclusion through the sharing of knowledge and experience, creating a level playing field for all.

 

Increasing Diversity in Physics:

  • The Center for Bright Beams is a member of the Institute for Broadening Participation (IBP) and participate in their PathwaysToScience program.
  • Diversity Toolbox for students and faculty
  • TeamUP: The AIP National Task Force to Elevate African American Representation in Undergraduate Physics & Astronomy (TEAM-UP)
  • STEP UP is a national community of physics teachers, researchers, and professional societies. We design high school physics lessons to empower teachers, create cultural change, and inspire young women to pursue physics in college.
  • Minorities in Physics Resource from APS