Skip to main content

The Center for Bright Beams, A National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center

Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU)

CBB's undergraduate research program provides students with an introduction to the field of accelerator physics and its outstanding challenges while also encouraging interested students to pursue a graduate degree in an accelerator-related field. During the semester or over the summer, students work alongside faculty, postdocs, and graduate students on carefully selected research topics. They also participate in group and theme meetings to learn about other's research and to present their own research.

APPLY TO A PARTICIPATING INSTITUTION

Download REU Brochure

@ Cornell University

At Cornell you'll be in close proximity to NYC and Niagara falls as well as Ithaca's unique landscape of waterfalls and gorges.
Cornell Application

@ BYU

The BYU program organizes weekly activities to many of Utah's outdoor attractions, such as Arches National Park and hiking the mountainous terrain.
BYU Application

@ UChicago

In the heart of Chicago students can take advantage of all the activities, arts, ethnic & cultural diversity, food, music, and sports that can be found in a large city.
UChicago Application

@ NIU

The NIU campus in DeKalb is an eclectic mix of architecture and beautiful natural spaces located 90 mins west of Chicago and within 1-hour from Fermilab and Argonne National Laboratory.
NIU Application
Map of past REU participants' home institutions
Undergraduate Grace Mattingly performing a test on a vacuum chamber with a Mott Polarimeter, used to measure polarization of GaAs photocathodes.

Contribute to cutting edge research at world leading institutions.

Experience interdisciplinary research, working side-by-side with material scientists, chemists, condensed matter physicists and accelerator scientists.

Learn alongside individuals from a wide range of nationalities, cultures and educational backgrounds. CBB continuously works toward the inclusion of under represented minorities women, and first-generation students.