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The Center for Bright Beams, A National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center

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CBB is pleased to announce new PhD Ryan Porter, whose thesis is, “Advancing the Maximum Accelerating Gradient of Niobium-3 Tin Superconducting Radiofrequency Accelerator Cavities”
I’m always impressed by the accomplishments of CBB students and postdocs, and as illustrated on p. 5 of this Newsletter, they are taking their scientific and collaborative skills to national labs, industry, and universities. 
Congratulations to Kyle Shen for being named Fellow of the American Physical Society.
The Center for Bright Beams has been awarded $22.5  million from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to continue gaining the fundamental understanding needed to transform the brightness of electron beams available to science, medicine and industry. 
CBB has been awarded $22.5 million from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to continue gaining the fundamental understanding needed to transform the brightness of electron beams available to science, medicine, and industry.
CBB is excited to announce that Professor Young-Kee Kim has been elected to the presidency of the American Physical Society! Professor Kim is a notable CBB scientist and key member of the leadership team. She leads initiatives in education and diversity and has shaped scientific direction.
Prof. Melissa Hines gives her lecture on "Designing Effective Scientific Graphics", July 20, 2021.
CBB Graduate Student Ryan Porter won one of the two second place prizes at the SRF ‘2021 conference, [which is] the main conference for the whole field of SRF.
Dr. Young-Kee Kim is seeking a postdoc who will work on the Center for Bright Beams’s “Beam Dynamics and Control” programs.
May 11, 2021
“The bigger accelerators that scientists use to collide particles have bunches of beams that circulate at one time,” Dick explains. “Beams become less intense and expand as they travel...We’re working to get [them] as small and bright as possible.”